Upcoming Courses

Spring 2023


Philosophy of Love and Sex

PHIL 1002 | Dr. Shannon Sullivan | MWF 11:15-12:05

Introduces students to the field of philosophy via the topic of love and sex.  Includes both historical (e.g., Plato, Augustine, and Freud) and contemporary perspectives on love and sex.  Topics may include: monogamy, homosexuality, bisexuality, intersexuality, sexual perversion and normality, masturbation, rape, prostitution, gay marriage, and pornography.


Introduction to Philosophy

PHIL 1101 | Dr. Mark Sanders | T/Th 10:00-11:15

Exploration of some of the basic problems that have shaped the history of philosophy (truth, knowledge, justice, beauty, etc.) and remain relevant to students today on personal and professional levels.  Readings will range from classical to contemporary texts by a variety of philosophers representing diverse perspectives on these problems.


Introduction to Philosophy (W)

PHIL 1102 | multiple sections

Exploration of some of the basic problems that have shaped the history of philosophy (truth, knowledge, justice, beauty, etc.) and remain relevant to students today on personal and professional levels.  Readings will range from classical to contemporary texts by a variety of philosophers representing diverse perspectives on these problems.


Critical Thinking (W)

PHIL 1105 | multiple sections

Fundamental skills of clear thinking that help students reason better during communication, problem-solving, and design, particularly as these integrate scientific/engineering efforts with social needs and values. Focuses on clarifying goals, identifying constraints, and generating and evaluating ideas or solutions.


Deductive Logic

PHIL 2105 | multiple sections

Principles of deductive logic, both classical and symbolic, with emphasis on the use of formal logic in analysis of ordinary language discourse.


Existentialism

PHIL 3140 | Dr. Gordon Hull | T/Th 10:00-11:15

The existentialist tradition in philosophy and literature, including such issues as authenticity, absurdity and the meaning of life, freedom and morality, anguish, death, and atheism.


Ethical Theory

PHIL 3210 | Dr. Daniel Boisvert | M 2:30-5:15

Selective examination of major normative and metaethical theories that undergird our practical judgments about morally right actions and virtuous persons. Normative theories studied may include virtue ethics, deontology, consequentialism, and representative feminist theories. Metaethical theories studied may include cognitivism, expressivism, realism, and error theory.


Healthcare Ethics

PHIL 3230 | Dr. Lisa Rasmussen | MWF 10:10-11:00

Major ethical dilemmas within medical science and biology are examined to assist students to identify, analyze, and decide ethical issues in such a way that they can defend their positions to themselves and others. Issues include reproductive and genetic technology, death and dying, patient rights, and justice in distribution of healthcare benefits and burdens.


Mind, Cognition, and Behavior

PHIL 3430 | Dr. Tina Talsma | MWF 1:25-2:15

An exploration of metaphysical questions concerning the mind, as viewed through classical and contemporary philosophical perspectives. Topics may include: the mind-body problem, personal identity, consciousness, and free will.


Senior Seminar (W, O)

PHIL 3620 | Dr. Martin Shuster | W 5:30-8:15

Students conclude their major by critically reflecting on the practice of philosophy itself. Our readings will examine notions of philosophy and critique, what it means to be a philosopher versus a critic or a critical theorist, and the possibilities philosophy offers us as human beings in the contemporary world.


Hip Hop as Redescription

PHIL 3990-001 | Dr. Mark Sanders | T/Th 4:00-5:15

In this class we will philosophically examine hip hop culture—its origins and evolution. We will consider many aspects, ideas, and perspectives of and on hip hop, including beats, lyrics, race, authenticity, misogyny, homophobia, commercialism, and more.


Disability Theory and Politics

PHIL 3990-002 | Dr. Amber Knight | T/Th 10:00-11:15

This course applies insights from the field of disability studies to contemporary political thought in order to examine the political nature of disability and the disabling nature of politics. In this course, students are exposed to varying definitions, cultural meanings, and representations of disability.


Alain Locke – Philosopher of the Harlem Renaissance

PHIL 4190 | Dr. Trevor Pearce | T/Th 1:00-2:15

This course is a deep dive into the philosophy of Alain LeRoy Locke, most famous as editor of The New Negro (1925), which collected the work of writers associated with the Harlem Renaissance. After spending the first third of the class learning about Locke's intellectual background, we will read most of his philosophical work.


Queer/Trans Latinx Studies

PHIL 4590 | Dr. Andrea Pitts| W 2:30-5:15

This course offers a survey of several major philosophical trajectories within U.S.-based queer and trans Latinx studies, including analyses of desire, selfhood, coalition building, aesthetics, embodiment, land-based politics, transnational borders, and historiography, with a focus on knowledge-building praxes.


Mysticism|Pornography|Subjectivity

PHIL 4990-090 | Dr. Kent Brintnall| T 5:30-8:15

Why do writers who attempt to record religious and erotic experiences so frequently appeal to the category of the inexpressible? Why are such experiences so frequently understood as disturbing to the fixity and coherence of the self? We will explore these questions through a reading of mystical texts, pornographic novels, and literary theory.


Disability, Technology, and Artificial Intelligence

PHIL 4990-091 | Dr. Damien Williams| Th 5:30-8:15

Why do facial recognition systems have problems with certain features and movements? Why can’t autonomous vehicles recognize wheelchair users? Why do some people think there’s a “right kind” of mind or body? In this course, we will seek the origins of these and other questions, and how the answers can have life or death results.